Sushi Cat’s Delicious Adventures

Hey, Geeks.

Do you love cats? Sushi? Computer games? Adorable animation? Chances are that you like at least one of these things; Sushi Cat and its three sequels from Armor Games will indulge your desire for all four. The game features a round, blue, sushi-loving cat who can only succeed in his quests for love and happiness by gaining weight. He does this by eating as much sushi as possible through a series of pinball games. Most of the sushi simply count toward achieving a full belly, but some pieces provide special abilities or other bonuses, such as an extra turn for the level or soy sauce bombs that allow you to collect all the sushi within the explosion’s reach.

Sushi Cat

Sushi Cat

Despite the game’s simplicity (the game requires only the ability to click your mouse strategically), I’ve played it on and off for a year now and still enjoy the experience. While I enjoy some hacking and slashing and shooting, sometimes it’s nice to let a game just make you happy. There’s plenty of opportunity for improvement in the game, as there is a certain amount of strategy involved and a lot of sushi to eat, but it’s easy enough to play if you are just looking for a relaxing way to pass the time.

Up until recently, I thought there were only three Sushi Cats: Sushi Cat, Sushi Cat 2, and Sushi Cat: The Honeymoon. Then I discovered Sushi Cat 2: The Great Purrade, which is less polished in terms of graphics and mechanics than the other games but almost makes up for it with added weirdness (the Nyan cat sushi gulp, for example). There’s no need to play the games in order, as they all function perfectly well as stand-alones, but I would recommend playing The Great Purrade after one of the others, as it doesn’t show the beloved furball at his best. The most sophisticated versions would probably be Sushi Cat 2 and Sushi Cat: The Honeymoon.

Sushi Cat's pirate costume

Sushi Cat’s pirate costume

The game isn’t perfect. Glitches related to excessive feline chubbiness can result in an endlessly-bouncing cat on some levels (in which case restarting the level is the only solution), and regardless of your pinball skills, the unpredictability of Sushi Cat’s bouncing often makes collecting ALL the sushi nigh-on impossible (a problem for the obsessive-compulsive among us, myself included). That said, the game makes up for these flaws with a delicious premise and bizarrely cute costumes for your character if you eat enough golden sushi. The game also isn’t trying to push a lot of barriers—Sushi Cat’s wife is pink, and arguments could be made about cultural appropriation (particularly with some of Sushi Cat’s costumes, cute as they are). The makers of the game seem to have only positive intentions, however, and there is something to be said for such a food-positive and plump-positive game. Fatness is Sushi Cat’s superpower.

Sushi Cat is appropriate for all ages and arguably fun for all ages as well. Those who like their games to always include blood and guts may find Sushi Cat’s mostly pastel palette and relentless cuteness boring, but others may find themselves fixated on getting that last piece of sushi in the corner behind a Japanese lantern or bicycle wheel. All four games consistently receive high ratings from players, and I still smile back at the Sushi-meter when its sad, hungry face perks up upon achieving a full belly.

Four rotund kitties out of 5.

meeplemeeplemeeplemeeple

 

2048 meowdifications (we apologise for the pun, but not really)

Hello, Geeks.

While I’m sure some of you roll your eyes and groan by now at the thought of 2048, we know our audience well enough to know that those who truly love the game are still obsessively moving tiles. For those who can’t give it up but want something fresh, and for anyone who is more a cat person than a numbers person, I present 2048’s cat editions. My favourite is the Waffles the Cat edition, which rewards you with new, adorable images of Waffles. There are, however, also 2048: LOL Cats and 2048 Cats (there are probably others as well, given that this is the internet).

2048: LOL Cat Edition

2048: LOL Cat Edition

I personally find the .gifs in 2048: LOL Cats distracting, but the endless loop of the hapless breaded tabby is admittedly entertaining.

2048 Cats Edition

2048 Cats Edition

The numbers on the cat images in 2048: Cats may help you keep track, but they also take away from the challenge of an image-based version of the game. The .gifs are somewhat less distracting, though (and, in my opinion, cuter).

2048: Waffles the Cat Edition

2048: Waffles the Cat Edition

The Waffles edition has a coherent, almost narrative flow to its cat images, presenting (static) images of Waffles at different stages (and in different costumes). The flow and cuteness of this edition keep me coming back to play again . . . and again . . . and again, though the original 2048 game lost me after two tries.

But don’t let me tell you which version to play. Check out these cat-themed versions for yourself and let us know what you thought in the comments.

Have a meowvelous day (sorry, not sorry),
Sarah, your resident cat fanatic

The Joy of Blending Cats: Kittens in a Blender

Hello, Geeks.

Normally Kenny will be writing the board game reviews, but as I am Geek Collateral’s resident cat fanatic, it is my pleasure to introduce you to Kittens in a Blender. It’s a fairly simple, deeply twisted card game: pick a kitten colour. Save your kittens from being blended. Turn your opponents’ kitties into cat purée.

Kittens in a Blender

Kittens in a Blender

The deck includes kittens for each player, cards that enable you to move kittens, cards to blend kittens, cards to save kittens from being blended, and cards that cause each player to pass their hand along. You start with six cards in each player’s hand. Each turn, you must use two and then pick up two. You want your kittens safe in the box (or at least on the counter) and your opponents’ kitties preparing mewing piteously from the murderous kitchen appliance. Whether you play with subtle strategy or for maximum carnage is up to you.

The game is quick and violent. I played against our CEO, Devin Edwards (though you can play with up to 4 people), and he made horrible whirring sounds when kittens died. He also insisted on reading out the names of the blended kittens at the end of each round. Sadist.

Kittens in a Blender Cards

Kittens in a Blender cards

Devin contemplating the deaths of countless kittens.

Devin contemplating the deaths of countless kittens/trying to look cute like the innocent kittens he is about to murder.

I was surprised by how affected I was by the blending. Maybe if the kittens didn’t have names or such cute cartoon faces, I would find it less upsetting. I found myself apologizing to Devin’s cats while I placed them in the blender, and I decided which of my own kittens to save according to how adorable the cards were (Ninja is just too cute to let die, but I don’t have quite the same attachment to Chester). Emotional trauma aside, Kittens in a Blender is a fun, fast-paced game that’s perfect for those with limited time (or a short attention span) and a dark sense of humour.

4/5 meeples and/or severed kitten limbs
meeplemeeplemeeplemeeple
Takes 30 minutes to play
From Closet Nerd and Redshift Games

Space Art at Creatures Creating

Ahoy, fellow geeks.

Some of my abstract pieces are currently on display at Creatures Creating gallery, and since they’re kind of geeky (as in, they are of space–stars clusters, galactic detritus, and what have you), I thought I’d share.

@Creatures Creating

@Creatures Creating

Me standing awkwardly with my art..

Me standing awkwardly with my art.

My family is very supportive.

My family is very supportive (see also the next photo).

My father looking at Devin Edwards's Geek Collateral business cards.

My father looking at Devin Edwards’s Geek Collateral business cards.

Visit Apple of My Odd Eye for more photos.

Boldly go,
Sarah

Science Fiction and Fantasy Art from the Geek Collateral Team

As some of you may know, many members of the Geek Collateral team are artists. A lot of it’s pretty geeky.

See exhibit A:

"Looking for the Ghost" - Sarah Y. Varnam

“Looking for the Ghost” – Sarah Y. Varnam

Recently (today, in fact!), I put together a post on Apple of my Odd Eye featuring some of my geekiest work to date, ranging from the robot doll contemplating her consciousness above to dryads and gorgons. To see more of my geeky art and more art in general, click this link or click on the robot.
Stay shiny,
Sarah